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Three Seeded Bread With Poolish Recipe 

 January 11, 2021

By  Gareth

medium

16 - 22 HOURS

france

I remember how I designed this three seeded bread recipe. Just after opening my bakery there were calls for a seeded bread from customers and staff. I had no recipe to adapt and nothing close. I copied and pasted a blank bakers formula, added the ingredients I wanted, and came up with a recipe.

And after the first trial bake, it was perfect. Since that day it was the most popular bread in the bakery, and the recipe never changed.

The three seeded bread was the first recipe that I made myself, and there have been many more since! This bread uses a seed soaker and a poolish pre-ferment.


How to make three seeded bread video lesson

Ingredients 


For the seed soaker:


     55g  Sesame seeds


     55g  Black poppy seeds


     55g  Sunflower seeds


   110g  Water


    6.6g   Salt


For the poolish:

   138g   White bread flour


   138g  Water


   0.3g   Fresh Yeast (0.15 active dried)


For the dough:

   467g  White bread flour 


     83g  Light rye flour


    1.1g  Fresh yeast (0.5 active dried)


      5g  Salt


1

To make the poolish, add the yeast to the water and whisk. If using dried yeast follow the instructions below. Next add the flour and combine with a dough scraper. Cover and leave untouched for 12-18 hours. 

At the same time as preparing the poolish, prepare the seed soaker. Add the seeds, salt and water and lightly stir. Cover and leave for the same amount of time as the poolish.

2

The poolish will have a significant amount of gas bubbles when it is ready. Weigh the ingredients and if using dried yeast add it to the water and whisk to dissolve 5 minutes before continuing.

3

Add all the ingredients including the poolish and the seed soaker to a large mixing bowl. Set a timer for ten minutes. Using a plastic dough scrapper incorporate the ingredients together using a fluid half turn method until ready to remove from the bowl and start slow kneading onto a table. Continue slow kneading until the timer sounds. Place back in the bowl, covered and in the fridge for 15 minutes.

4

After the rest, remove from the bowl, back onto the table and start a timer for ten minutes. Fast knead the dough until the timer sounds and place the dough back into the bowl and cover.

5

Take a temperature check, if above 24C (75) put it in the fridge, if it’s under leave it on the kitchen table. Allow to rest, covered for another hour.

6

After the hour, degas or stretch and fold and bulk ferment in the bowl again for a second hour. Again take a temperature check and decide whether to do this in the fridge or in the kitchen.

7

Divide the dough into two pieces, push the gas out of the dough and pre-shape into rounds. Place on the worktop to bench rest for 10 minutes.

8

Flatten the dough pieces and shape into bloomer shapes. Give them a light misting with water and roll in the seed mixture, the seam area is going to me at the bottom so no need to seed that area. Put the dough in the bannetons, seed side down.

9

Proof for 2 hours and preheat the oven to 250C (480F). Prepare a peel with a light dusting of flour.

10

Once the breads have risen over the tops of the bannetons turn the breads out of the baskets and  onto the peel. Cut with a large cut length-ways at a slight angle.

11

Drop into the oven, directly on the stone with plenty of steam. Lower the temperature to 230C (440F). Bake for 40-55 minutes, lower the temperature to 210C (410F) after 25 minutes.

12

Once the bread's crust has gone nice and golden, using the peel, remove them from the oven and allow to cool.

Method using a dough mixer


1

To make the poolish, add the yeast to the water and whisk. If using dried yeast follow the instructions below. Next add the flour and combine with a dough scraper. Cover and leave untouched for 12-18 hours.

At the same time as preparing the poolish, prepare the seed soaker. Add the seeds, salt and water and lightly stir. Cover and leave. 

2

The poolish will have a significant amount of gas bubbles when it is ready. Weigh the ingredients and if using dried yeast add it to the water and whisk to dissolve 5 minutes before continuing.

3

Add all the ingredients including the poolish and the seed soaker to the mixing bowl. Mix for 8 slow minutes, then for 6 minutes fast.

4

Take out the mixer and place in a bowl, cover and bulk ferment for one hour. If dough temperature is above 24C (75F) use the fridge.

5

After the hour, degas or stretch and fold and bulk ferment in the bowl again for a second hour. Again take a temperature check and decide whether to do this in the fridge or in the kitchen.

6

Divide the dough into two pieces, push the gas out of the dough and pre-shape into rounds. Place on the worktop to bench rest for 10 minutes.

7

Flatten the dough pieces and shape into bloomer shapes. Give them a light misting with water and roll in the seed mixture, the seam area is going to me at the bottom so no need to seed that area. Put the dough in the bannetons, seed side down.

8

Proof for 2 hours and preheat the oven to 250C (480F). Prepare a peel with a light dusting of flour.

9

Once the breads have risen over the tops of the bannetons turn the breads out of the baskets and  onto the peel. Cut with a large cut length-ways at a slight angle.

10

Drop into the oven, directly on the stone with plenty of steam. Lower the temperature to 230C (440F). Bake for 40-55 minutes, lower the temperature to 210C (410F) after 25 minutes.

11

Once the bread's crust has gone nice and golden, using the peel, remove them from the oven and allow to cool.


Using dried yeast


If using instant yeast, divide the amount of fresh yeast used by 3 and follow the same method as fresh yeast.

Active dried yeast needs to be activated before use. In this case, warm the water for the poolish to 35C (95F) - no higher. Add the yeast to the bowl, whisk and leave for 10 minutes to bloom. Combine the flour for the poolish with the yeasty water and place in the fridge for 10 minutes to cool. Return to the worktop and allow to ferment as above.

When ready to start the dough, warm 10 grams of water to 35C (95F), add the yeast with half a teaspoon of sugar, whisk and leave to stand for ten minutes before adding to the dough. Remove 10 grams of water from the recipe.


Top tips for the best three seeded bread


Use French T55 or T65 flour if you can get it for this bread. It generates the perfect crust colouration.

Three seeded bread can be prepared the night before and left to proof slowly in the fridge. You could also toast the seeds in a pan before soaking, this draws out more flavour.

Try seeded bread toasted, with a poached egg, the combination of nutty seeds plus the aroma of a small amount of rye is potentially life changing!

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